Preeclampsia occurs in 5 to 8% of pregnancies and is a major contributor of premature deliveries and neonatal morbidity in the U.S. and worldwide. It is characterized by new onset hypertension and proteinuria after 20 weeks of gestation and delivery is currently the only treatment. Because the etiology of preeclampsia is poorly understood, our ability to distinguish between different hypertensive disorders of pregnancy remains limited.  In addition, our ability to predict and prevent preeclampsia continues to be poor. We have previously blogged about the use of circulating angiogenic factors such as soluble fms-like tyrosine 1 (sFLT-1) and placental growth factor (PlGF) as early predictors of preeclampsia.

About The Author

Professor of Pathology & Immunology, and Obstetrics & Gynecology, Washington University School of Medicine

Dr. Gronowski is a Professor of Pathology & Immunology, and Obstetrics & Gynecology at Washington University School of Medicine (St. Louis Missouri). She is Associate Medical Director of the Clinical Chemistry and Serology & Immunology laboratories at Barnes-Jewish Hospital. Dr. Gronowski received her Ph.D. in Endocrinology- Reproductive Physiology from University of Wisconsin, and is a diplomate of the American Board of Clinical Chemistry. Dr. Gronowski is past president of the American Board of Clinical Chemistry and the American Association for Clinical Chemistry. Her research focuses primarily on the laboratory diagnostics of endocrinology and reproductive physiology with a particular emphasis on maternal fetal medicine. She edited the book entitled “Handbook of Clinical Laboratory Testing During Pregnancy”.